List of OA journals in geography, political ecology, and various social sciences

“…….So things might have happily continued, had not the corporate interests within this limited, subsidised economy pushed journal subscription prices to the point where access to the knowledge went into a state of decline, at a time when new publishing technologies enabled researchers to take publishing back into their own hands. These new technologies have been used to demonstrate how access can be greatly increased, improving the circulation of knowledge, restoring the researcher’s control of knowledge, and extending its value as a public good by making it far more widely available.” Willinsky J. 2003. The Nine Flavours of Open Access Scholarly Publishing . J Postgrad Med  49:263-7.

Academics write most of their work in journals. Journals should publish and curate good quality work, but unfortunately the majority are also used to make money for commercial publishers. This is not a win-win situation. Corporate profits are frequently high because companies retain author copyrights, and sell the material to (mainly) scholarly and university libraries, that frequently struggle to stock key journals.  Five companies are now dominating the field, and buying out smaller ones. Academics do not rock the boat on this very often, because their  prestige and career is linked too much to the journals they publish in, and most of the prestigious ones are commercial and expensive. Our systems of merit and performance measures are not yet geared to rewarding publishing that is ethical, or based on social justice criteria. This is especially bad at research universities. (good ref. here)

To make some contribution to the debate about whether social scientists can avoid the big commercial, firewalled journals, I list below decent academic journals that are free or cheap to publish in, have proper refereeing, and are Open Access – free for readers. Copyright is retained by the author in most but not quite all of them. Open access journals can impose fees on authors instead of readers. Those  with high fees above cUS$500 for authors are excluded- like most social scientists I don’t have more than this to contribute to a publication and I don’t think more is justified. There is a long debate about whether in our internet world, we should be paying at all, which I won’t get into here.

The list is partly for my own benefit and my students, hence the small number of themes, [environment & development, human geography, anthropology, urban studies and planning, general social science, and the research/publication process]  but may be useful to others. Further discussion on journals and open access here. I have included Scopus, Web of Science (formerly ISI) and the new Emerging Sources Citation Index listings * because they are the main systems of constant ranking and hierarchy that we have, much as it would be fairer to ignore them and just publish in the most appropriate venue for the readership.

For the majority of my colleagues reading this who have not thought much about OA and publishing ethics (and are manically trying to publish in the best places), I hope you find something you can contribute to. In brief, open access is the best way to publish scholarly material – more readers, and articles under authors’ control. It is a logical outcome of the invention of the web, and the Academic Spring protests of 2012, which have had echoes – eg the recent Lingua  debacle over the resignation of an editorial board that was dissatisfied with Elsevier’s control of copyright and high OA charges, and all the Netherlands universities fight with the same company in 2015 about high charges.  Scott Aaronson says 

“…much of the serious content on the Internet remains sequestered behind pointless, artificial walls—walls that serve the interests of neither the readers nor the authors, but only of the wall-builders themselves. If I have a medical problem, why can’t I download the full text of clinical studies dealing with that problem? Why do so many researchers still not post their papers on their web pages—or if they do, then omit their early papers? When will we in academia get our act together enough to make the world’s scholarly output readable, for free, by anyone with a web browser? “

Most of the journals on the list are run by the “community economies” of unpaid academics, university libraries or departments, or scholarly societies, and a few are commercial but still have acceptable author fees that mere mortals could afford (APCs) **. Only if the big publishers are able to offer OA at reasonable fees, is it worth considering publishing an OA article with them. That said, as Prof. Tim Gowers argues, journals these days exist only to accommodate author prestige – you can publish anything online, or easily just email the author for a copy of an article (or use Researchgate and Academia). So OA journals need to be as good in quality and meticulous as those conventional ones that are costing our libraries a fortune. I hope I only list good ones here.

The invention of the web and its beginnings in the early 1990s spelled the end of the need for conventional firewalled journals. Printed copies are no longer required (although they may be desired by a few)  and the culture among scholars has changed to storing individual article PDFs and only printing them if needed. There are few costs for hosting a journal online – storing its files is easy. Costs, or value, are all in the labour.  To suggest there are major cost implications of OA is not true, unless professional editors or translators are used. If publishing is done largely by academics and their institutions, which is my hope, the cost of running journals is absorbed into regular workloads or taken up by grants, and we have a true change in publishing underway. “The commitment of scholars everywhere to finding new ways of improving access to knowledge”(Willinsky 2003) need not be commercialised or costly. The ‘big five’ publishers (who now  control 66% of papers in social sciences in the WoS, and rising…) and some of the smaller ones will have to adapt or perish (but they do produce indexing, which is useful for now). We will have our copyrights and a larger potential readership, and university libraries will have more money to spend. We will also be able to support smaller and multilingual world periphery journals.

Useful sites

Journals in political ecology, environment, development and associated areas (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

  • AgBioForum: the journal of agrobiotechnology management and economics  Univ of Missouri-Columbia with a federal grant. Critical articles on GM tech etc. allowed. Free. Straightforward website. Copyright – read the details, used to be CC-BY. http://www.agbioforum.org Scopus Y
  • The Arizona Journal of Environmental Law & Policy. Student run, no indexing. http://www.ajelp.com/ (law schools are often quite wealthy and they like to have their own online journal. Nothing wrong with that but only a few are listed on this site)
  • Conservation and Society Indian publisher, international editors, one is in my School.  http://www.conservationandsociety.org/ Scopus Yes, Web of Science yes, Free.  Rejected me twice!
  • Culture, Climate and Change: Biocultural Systems and Livelihoods
     Did not proceed in 2011 but being revitalized from Peru in 2016 – watch their site.  http://journals.sfu.ca/ccc/index.php/ccc/index
  • Electronic Green Journal general environmental, UCLA library.  http://escholarship.org/uc/uclalib_egj   Scopus Yes, Web of Science No. Free.
  • Environmental Humanities. Newish offshoot from the AustHumRev below. University sponsored mainly from UNSW Sydney.  htttp://environmentalhumanities.org/  Web of Sci no, Emerging Sources Citation Index yes, Scopus no (too new), Free.
  • Espace populations sociétés  French and English. Published by University of Lille 1 http://eps.revues.org/  Web of Sci no, Scopus yes, Free
  • Ethnobiology Letters  International board. Also does mini-review papers.  http://ojs.ethnobiology.org/index.php/ebl/index  Scopus Y
  • Environnement Urbain/ Urban Environment. founded 2007, bilingual, Canadian, free I think.   https://eue.erudit.org/?lang=en or http://www.vrm.ca/contenu-vrm/revue-eue/  Scopus and WoS, no. Takes long papers up to 10,000 words, hurrah!
  • Environmental Health Perspectives http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/  Web of Sci. yes with index of over 7, Scopus yes, free to publish and read. One of the top public health journals in the world. Publishes only 15% of submissions.
  • Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics. Publisher is Inter-Research in Germany, funded by the late Otto Klinne (it also has a foundation). Some of their journals are author-pays, but this one is still free for the moment (2016). Scopus yes, Web of Science no. http://www.int-res.com/journals/esep/esep-home
  • HARVARD ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REVIEW  WoS yes. Scopus Yes. http://harvardelr.com/ Free, as with many US law school journals. See also the Environmental Law Review Syndicate harvardelr.com/elrs/
  • Human Ecology Review  This US journal was always available online and free at a website, but is now published by ANU ePress in Australia. ANU are not doing themselves any favours – the current website is incomplete (a journal needs a dedicated page with submission instructions, and epub downloads are restrictive). It is still listed in WoS masterlist but as a US publication. Scopus Y.
  • International Journal of the Commons. Supported by IASC and in honour of Nobel winner Elinor Orstom who was involved before her death.   http://www.thecommonsjournal.org/  Scopus yes, Web of Sci yes, author charges can approach $500 for an article.
  • Future of Food: Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society.
    http://futureoffoodjournal.org/index.php/journal Univ.Kassel and Union of German Scientists. Free, young scholar focus, not indexed. Confusing dual website.
  • Journal of Agriculture and Environment for International Development. Published in Italy since 1907, but made online and free only a few years ago. Social science papers rare but possible. http://www.iao.florence.it/ojs/index.php/JAEID/index  Not indexed.
  • Journal of Ecological Anthropology.  University of South Florida. http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/jea/ Free, unindexed but some good papers.
  • [Journal of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology University of Georgia, seems to have disappeared. Used to enjoy that one.] 
  • Journal of Natural Resources and Development.  http://jnrd.info/  Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile with German support, nice layout but should be CCBY copyright.  Web of Sci no, Scopus no, Free.
  • Journal of Political Ecology  http://jpe.library.arizona.edu. Scopus yes, Web of Sci no, Free. Everything is done by academics, and housed at U. of Arizona library.  I edit this one and it is a labour of love.
  • International Journal of Environment Nepalese, not indexed. Free. http://nepjol.info/index.php/IJE/index
  • Natural Resources Journal. University of New Mexico. “The NRJ welcomes articles on natural and environmental resources and the law, especially as it relates to policy and interdisciplinary efforts.” Scopus Yes, Web of Science Yes.  http://lawschool.unm.edu/NRJ
  • Pacific Geographies  http://www.pacific-geographies.org/ Small German online journal. WoS N, Scopus N. Free and generally does themed issues on Pacific topics.
  • Places Journal. Architecture and landscape architecture/planning  focus. Peer refereeing option.  https://placesjournal.orgWeb of Sci applied for, Scopus Yes, Free
  • &lt;iframe style=”display:none;visibility:hidden” width=”0″ height=”0″ src=”//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-WMB4CQ”&gt;&lt;/iframe&gt;<!–Present Environment and Sustainable Development Romanian jounral published by deGruyter open. Free and unindexed. http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/pesd
  • Primate Conservation published by Conservation International and IUCN. Scopus Yes, WoS Yes.  http://www.primate-sg.org/primate_conservation/
  • Problemy Ekorozwoju/Problems of Sustainable Development. European Academy of Science and Arts (Salzburg, Austria). Scopus yes, Web of Science yes. Polish/English and free. http://ekorozwoj.pol.lublin.pl/
  • Riparian Ecology & Conservation. DeGruyter pubs. Free. Not indexed yet, quite scientific orientation. http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/remc
  • Recreation and Society in Africa, Asia and Latin America (RASAALA) Univ of Guelph.  Free. https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/rasaala/index WoS No, Scopus No.
  • Rural Landscapes: society, environment and history http://www.rurallandscapesjournal.com/ Stockholm University are the publishers.  Scopus No, WoS No. New, very professional format. Research article fee £250.00.
  • Suburban Sustainability  Hofstra Univ.  http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/subsust/  Not much information on site. Assume Scopus No, Web of Sci No, Free.
  • Transdisciplinary Journal of Environmental Studies. Roskilde University Denmark.   http://www.journal-tes.dk/  Scopus No, Web of Sci no, Free. One of the early ones, now needs a spruce-up.
  • The Trumpeter – Journal of Ecosophy  http://trumpeter.athabascau.ca/index.php/trumpet/index  un-indexed.
  • Water Alternatives International board and team.  http://www.water-alternatives.org/  Scopus Yes, WoS No, Emerging Sources Citation Index Y. Appears to be free to publish.

Geography (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

  • ACME: the International E-journal for Critical Geographieshttp://acme-journal.org/index.php/acme  Web of Sci no, Scopus yes, at least for 2014 (they refuse all rankings officially, but are highly cited anyway), Free. Canadian university based, run by an academic collective.
  • Applied GIS   Developed by a colleague at Melbourne. “applied remote sensing” and “applied social science.” http://appliedgis.net/  Scopus Yes.
  • Articulo – Journal of Urban Studies Now English only (used to be French as well)  and based at U of Southern Denmark. A nonprofit association registered in France. Free, Scopus yes, WoS No.
  • AUC Geographica ( Acta Universitatis Carolinae, Geographica). Karolinum Press, University Press, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.  Scopus Yes, WoS No. Free. Looks ok and internationalised. http://www.aucgeographica.cz/index.php/AUC_Geographica
  • Belgeo. Belgian Journal of Geography. The Belgian geography journal with national Geog Society support. English, Dutch, French and German. https://belgeo.revues.org/?lang=en  Web of Sci no, Scopus no, Free
  • Boletín de la Asociación de Geógrafos Españoles A national association journal of the Asociación de Geógrafos Españoles in Spain. English and Spanish, with a bias towards Spanish topics. H Index 28 which is pretty high. Free, website could use work. http://boletin.age-geografia.es Web of Science Yes, Scopus Yes.
  • Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series. Polish journal, international, published by deGruyter Open.  http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bog  Scopus Yes, WoS No, Emerging Sources Citation Index  yes. There is also also a Bulletin of Geography. Physical Geography Series which is not indexed.
  • Cinq Continents: Revue Roumaine de Géographie http://cinqcontinents.geo.unibuc.ro/index.html  Geography journal. No indexing. French, English, Romanian
  • Cybergeo – France. General geography, some English articles. http://cybergeo.revues.org/ . Scopus Yes, Web of Science no. Free. Getting a volume number on screen is difficult. 
  • Cuadernos GeográficosSince 1971,  University of Granada (Spain). Quite a lot of English papers.  http://revistaseug.ugr.es/index.php/cuadgeo/index Scopus Y  (some confusion in Scopus-says published in Colombia)
  • Die Erde  Berlin Geog Soc. journal.  Decent. http://www.die-erde.org/index.php Page charges are € 12.50. Scopus Yes.
  • Documents d’Anàlisi Geogràfica Departaments of Geografia de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona i de la Universitat de Girona, Spain. Publishes free in Catalan, English, Spanish. In Scopus and the new  Emerging Sources Citation Index (comes below WoS). http://dag.revista.uab.es/index
  • EchoGéo  https://echogeo.revues.org/?lang=en  French and English. Produced from the Sorbonne in Paris. Environment and development theme in English and french. Good Board. Web of Sci no, Scopus no, Free.
  • European Journal of Spatial Development.  Nordregio, Sweden  and  Delft University of Technology. http://www.nordregio.se/European-Journal-of-Spatial-Development . Free, Scopus Y, WoS No.
  • L’espace politique. Geopolitics, political geography. Bilingual. No indexing.  https://espacepolitique.revues.org
  • Estudios Geográficos Institute Juan Sebastián Elcano (CSIC), Spain. Nearly all articles are in Spanish but there are instructions in English. Free. In Scopus and the new  Emerging Sources Citation Index (comes below WoS). http://estudiosgeograficos.revistas.csic.es
  • European Journal of Geography Edited from Greece for the European Association of Geographershttp://www.eurogeographyjournal.eu/  Only takes articles up to 5,000 words (a bit short). Scopus Yes.
  • European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies (ERLACS) Geographers involved, edited from CEDLA Amsterdam since 1965. http://www.erlacs.org/   Appears to be free.   Max 8000 words. Bilingual.  Scopus yes.
  • Fennia – International Journal of Geography.  Finnish national Journal with official support. New editor from 2016 & a good choice for international papers.  http://ojs.tsv.fi/index.php/fennia. Web of Sci  applied for, Scopus yes. Free
  • Finisterra – Revista Portuguesa de Geografia (Portugese, English, Français, Spanish, Italian).  Started in 1996, Universidade de Lisboa. A free journal wanting to internationalise.  Scopus Y.  Click on ‘novo site’ – otherwise it only goes to 2014. Needs sorting out. http://www.ceg.ul.pt/finisterra
  • Forum Geografic Romanian universities run this. Website is advanced with DOIs and citation management, but it seems impossible to get a list of issues except for the current one,  and there is no ‘about the journal’ page. Free to read and submit. Unindexed.  http://forumgeografic.ro/
  • Geografia-Malaysian Journal of Society and Space  Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Much local material, not indexed. Free. Bilingual. http://www.ukm.my/geografia/v1/?cont=d&item=1&ver=loc
  • Geographia Polonica. Produced by Polish Academy of Sciences, Geography Divn. https://www.geographiapolonica.pl/  Not bad, and free to publish.  There are printed copies but PDFs are online. Scopus Yes.  History
  • Geographica Helvetica. Swiss national geography journal with official support  http://www.geographica-helvetica.net/index.html Web of Sci no, Scopus no, Free. The lack of indexing is surprising.
  • GeoFocus. Revista Internacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de la Información Geográfica. Spanish (mainly), Portuguese and English occasionally. A GIS journal. In Scopus and the new  Emerging Sources Citation Index (comes below WoS). http://www.geofocus.org/index.php/geofocus/index
  • Ghana Journal of Geography University of Ghana, Legon. Unindexed.  http://www.ajol.info/index.php/gjg/index
  • Human Geographies – Journal of Studies and Research in Human Geography University of Bucharest. Free, since 2007. http://www.humangeographies.org.ro Scopus Yes. 
  • GeoJournal of Tourism and Geosites. Published by Romanian and Polish universities. Free online. http://gtg.webhost.uoradea.ro/index.html Scopus Yes.
  • Historical Geography University of New Mexico. Actually, you need a subscription to view the current issue. However free to publish and read thereafter. Scopus Yes.  https://ejournals.unm.edu/index.php/historicalgeography/index
  • Italian Journal of Planning Practice New, issue 1 is 2014. Free, not indexed.  http://ijpp.uniroma1.it/index.php/it/index
  • Journal of Alpine Research / Revue de géographie alpine. Institut de géographie alpine, since 1913. A social science journal. Two languages, one of which must be French, Italian, German or Spanish, the other being in English (you are supposed to do your own translation, this may be a constraint). Institut de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble.  https://rga.revues.org/?lang=en  Web of Science Y, Scopus Y. Free but no CCBY copyright transfer.
  • Journal of Environmental  Geography University of Szeged, Hungary, published by deGruyter. Free to submit and read. Unindexed. http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jengeo
  • Journal of Spatial Information Science (JOSIS) http://www.josis.org/index.php/josis Archived at University of Maine, but international and with a good site, as you would expect given the fields of the editors. Scopus yes, WoS N.
  • Journal for Geography  / Revija za geografijo  University of Mariboru, Slovenia. English/Slovenian. Lacks a dedicated web – best I can find is this  http://www.ff.um.si/dotCMS/listProducts?categoryInode=15123. Not indexed. 
  • Journal of Urban and Regional Analysis (the Jura Review). Published at U. of Bucharest and an editor at U. Glasgow. Pretty international.  http://www.jurareview.ro/index.htm. Scopus Yes.
  • Literary Geographies  Edited by Sheila Hones et al. around the world.  http://www.literarygeographies.net/
  • Métropoles Good urban geography journal, bilingual.   http://metropoles.revues.org/  no indexing. free.
  • Miscellanea Geographica: Regional Studies on Development. A Polish journal just becoming more international. Free to publish. http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mgrsd 
  • Mitteilungen der Österreichischen Geographischen Gesellschaft (Communications of the Austrian Geographical Society) Actually this one is NOT fully online for all readers, you have to have a subscription. I put it here since I am hoping they will change their mind, since it is a society published, English and German, Web of Science listed, geography journal – so all too rare. http://www.moegg.ac.at
  • Moravian Geographical Reports Now published by DeGruyter for a Czech Republic Institute.  Editor is at York U, Canada though. In both Scopus and Web of Science (impact 2014, 0.8). Some regional focus on Eastern Europe. http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/mgr  Free, and PDFs here 
  • Pacific Geographies  http://www.pacific-geographies.org/ Small German online journal. WoS N, Scopus N. Free and generally does themed issues on Pacific topics.
  • People Place and Policy. Sheffield Hallam University. ‘no rigid house style’ – hurrah! Free. http://extra.shu.ac.uk/ppp-online/ unindexed.
  • plaNext.  Published by AESOP’s (planning) Young Academics Network in Europe. free. New website is coming. A better name needed? http://www.aesop-youngacademics.net/en/planext
  • Politics of Place “…is a peer-reviewed journal for postgraduates. …. the relationship between culture and spatiality in works of literature, engaging particularly with issues of nationhood, community, class, marginality, and the self”. Not indexed. University of Exeter. Free.  http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/politicsofplace
  • Revista Movimentos Sociais e Dinâmicas Espaciais (Social Movements and Spatial Dynamics). Social Movements and Urban Space Research Group, Brazil (MSEU/UFPE). (5 languages, Portuguese origin). Not indexed.
  • Review of International Geographical Education Online http://www.rigeo.org/  unindexed. International contributors, free, editor is at Eskisehir Osmangazi University,Turkey.
  • Revista latinoamericana de estudios urbano regionales (EURE) Produced by stalwarts at Universidad Católica de Chile. Mostly Latin American, and  in Spanish but some English papers. Think about it, because in both Scopus and Web of Science and free!  http://eure.cl/index.php/eure/about
  • Spatial Justice / Justice Spatiale  http://www.jssj.org/   Bilingual and each is translated. (They refuse indexing).
  • Spatium. Institute of Architecture and Urban and Spatial Planning, Serbia.  http://www.iaus.ac.rs/code/navigate.aspx?Id=220  free, 5000 words max, design/architecture focus. Scopus y.

Anthropology (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

  • AnthropoChildren   Université de Liège. “Ethnographic perspectives on children & childhood” French/English. Free, not indexed. http://popups.ulg.ac.be/2034-8517/index.php
  • Anthropology of Food Free. Not indexed. Dedicated team in France, on the French Revues site. French or English. http://aof.revues.org
  • Anthropology Matters  Student/early career – run UK journal, part of the ASA. Free.  http://www.anthropologymatters.com/
  • Anthropology & Materialism: a Journal of Social Research. From Université Paris 1  Sorbonne and other partners. On the French Revues site. Free and in English, French, German or Spanish. Themes issues yearly (modest number of papers). Free. No indexing yet. http://am.revues.org
  • Anthropological Notebooks  Slovene Anthropological Society. WoS Yes, and Scopus Yes. And free! (this appears to be a rare case of all three). Articles up to 10,000 words.  http://www.drustvo-antropologov.si/anthropological_notebooks_eng.html
  • Anthrovision “…visual anthropology and the anthropology of the visual”. Visual Anthropology Network of the European Association of Social Anthropologists. http://anthrovision.revues.org  free, unindexed yet.
  • Antipoda   Anthropology/archaeology journal with Latin America focus. Univ. Los Andes, Bogota, The best one in S. America). All papers appear free. Mostly in Spanish http://antipoda.uniandes.edu.co/index.php  Scopus Y
  • Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia). Published since 1853. Brill, Netherlands.  http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/bijdragen-tot-de-taal-land-en-volkenkunde-journal-humanities-and-social-scienc Web of Science yes, Scopus yes. Commercially published but free, due to a professional society subvention.
  • Bulletin de l’APAD  Association Euro-Africaine pour l’Anthropologie du Changement Social et du Développement. Actually this is a really good bilingual journal of development and anthropology. http://apad.revues.org  Web of Sci no, Scopus no. Free
  • Collegium Antropologicum Croatia. Journal of the Croatian Anthropological Society. Quite a lot of biological anthropology. Fee suggested: E200. Web of Science Yes, Scopus Yes. http://www.collantropol.hr/antropo/index
  • Cultural Anthropology American Anthropological Association.  OA since 2013. Submission fee $21 if a non-member (member fees for AAA and SCA and vary by income).  http://www.culanth.org/  Web of Sci Yes and Scopus Yes. Appears free to read now, for recent years only- it was previously firewalled.
  • HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory http://haujournal.org  “…aims to situate ethnography as the prime heuristic of anthropology”. Appears to be un-indexed but with prestigious authors and a growing presence since 2011.
  • Omertaa, journal for Applied Anthropology. Associated with Leuven U. through Expeditions, Research in Applied Anthropology. Unindexed, free I imagine, some good papers, but essential information on submissions is missing from website (format annoying). Last paper was 2014. http://www.omertaa.org/
  • The Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography For undergrad work. You need a faculty sponsor to attest the work is genuine. http://undergraduateethnography.org/
  • Revista de Antropología Iberoamericana A few English articles. Free. Indexed in Scopus (low score) and Web of Sciencehttp://www.aibr.org/antropologia/netesp/1002.php
  • Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America. Trinity University, Digital Commons. Unindexed. Free.  http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/tipiti/
  • Urbanities: journal of urban ethnography Founded in Italy, University of Kent base. http://www.anthrojournal-urbanities.com/ .  Free. Does not offer CCBY copyright but it is there in spirit. Scopus Yes.
  • Vibrant: Virtual Brazilian Anthropology  Brazilian Anthropological Association. http://vibrant.revues.org. English, French and Spanish. Free. Unindexed.

Urban studies and planning (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

Other social science of interest (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

Publishing and university teaching/research issues (remember- free to read, author submission costs free<>$500)

Book Publishers

*Scopus only lists only  bona fide journals of all types, totalling over 30,000 of which a growing percentage are OA, and assigns them scores for impact. The masterlist can be downloaded here. Web of Science (formerly ISI) encompasses the top journals in the world by impact so it is a bit more selective. Here is the master list.  The same company have recently started the Emerging Sources Citation Index listings which is journals that are rising in impact but not yet on the WoS. There are many other indeces of impact, but none are counted seriously in the world’s top academic establishments.

**I have left off MDPI journals like Recycling because while some are free, eventually they usually go over the $500 limit, and the company had some bad press (but is currently in the clear). You can browse their list.

 

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Filed under academic relevance, Open access publishing, political ecology

Short article on radical scholarship

Batterbury, S.P.J. 2015. Who are the radical academics today? The Winnower  6pp.

ABSTRACT

This brief article suggests radical scholarship needs redefinition in the reality of contemporary university life. It must include the conduct of research that supports justice; greater relevance and engagement outside the university; and more attention to  “…the ethics by which and toward which knowledge is produced”, meaning the maintenance of sound personal ethics in everyday life. To be rude, selfish and unduly ambitious demeans any remaining progressive agenda in today’s universities.

https://thewinnower.com/papers/327-who-are-the-radical-academics-today

Please comment on the Winnower site.  Read by 2300 people in a  month!

Earlier blog version with comments: https://simonbatterbury.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/where-have-the-radical-scholars-gone/

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Brompton vs. Birdy – the folding bike wars

Bickerton, 1970s – the handlebars collapsed

Raleigh RSW

Raleigh RSW – inefficient balloon tyres and weighed a ton

Folding bikes are icons of sustainable transportation, and of great personal interest to me. We grew up in the transport-deficient London suburbs, and a folding bike was very handy. My Dad had a couple of Raleigh RSW folders with small balloon tyres in the 1970s (see left) – they were too heavy, folded badly, and not really very workable. I snapped the front fork on a grey 3speed one. I  also had a purple Raleigh 18 as a teenager in the 1970s.  We also had a Bickerton, the extremely lightweight 1970s aluminium bike that tended to bend under stress, collapse, and even break under duress (left). I inherited that one, and broke it in the 1990s.

One of my Mk 1 Birdys, which lives in the UK

Birdy Mk 1 – one of mine

Since 1995 I have had an R&M Birdy (photo right, my one). I bought one of the very first Birdys, and now own a current model as well. The point of all of these bikes was to allow some degree of portability and thus more flexible use. In the rather small world of folding bike enthusiasts, there is a never-ending search for the ‘gold standard’ – a bike that weighs very little, rides comfortably and fast, and folds up nicely so you can store it easily in a building, on a bus, train or in a car.

Brompton from Wiki Commons

Brompton

Folders require more technological ingenuity than a ‘cumbersome’ but the big money in the cycling industry has never really supported them – folders tend to be the domain of a few eccentric shoestring designers, and also some larger companies based in China or Taiwan than have a mix of cheap and passable designs for the global market.There are some top-end models produced by these bigger companies, currently dominated by Dahon and Tern (my Dahon Jetstream SP, like the one on the left, is passable and currently ridden by my 11 year old).Dahon Jetstream But purchasers with money to spend on a good folder (currently, let’s say US$1300 or so minimum) have been, for two decades or more, attracted by R&M’s Birdy and the Brompton.

Andrew Richie

Andrew Richie with early folded Brompton

For supporters of these two machines, every other brand is a distraction. Both were designed by backyard budding engineers with scant resources.  Andrew Richie (photo, Wiki Commons) borrowed money from 10 friends to get his 1976 Brompton prototype into operation, but by 1982 had ceased production pending a further capital injection. Alex Moulton and Harry Bickerton were the other lone British bike inventors (the Bickerton was a particular influence on Richie, who thought he could do a better job). Moultons do not fold. The Birdy was built by 2 students in a garage in Germany in the early 1990s. In the last couple of years, Brompton seems to be winning decisively in the marketplace. I move between countries a fair bit, and I see far more Bromptons now in London and the UK (understandable since the bikes are made there), Australia, Belgium, France and even in the USA. A Birdy is a rare sighting although I will soon travel to Berlin, and I will be looking out for this German brand (sorry guys-more Bromptons there too). The success of the Brompton is due  in part to marketing and supply – after a rocky supply chain since the mid 2000s they have become very efficient in their London operation, while R&M, based in Germany, have made some effort to supply outlets in important western world markets, but with less success except Japan. Discussion of the changing market for folders can be found at AtoB magazine, who are currently (2015) running a series of articles comparing folders in different price bands. You would think that the quality of the bike itself would also determine consumer choice, not just the ease of purchase and the supply chain.  If anything, quality should be the main determinant of market success. But I am unconvinced this is really true, as is Dave Henshaw in AtoB whose articles include reliable bike testing.  I think Bromptons are rather like Apple products – they are good but they also encourage loyalty and lock-in. Like Apple, Bromptons have a lot of unique parts. And customers return, sometimes to trade in for a superior model after a few years. They rarely choose to swap to anything better, including a Birdy. I don’t know enough Birdy owners to say if the reverse is true, but it probably is.

birdy folding

Birdy folding

In my view the Birdy is a far superior machine, but it is overpriced in some countries and has lost the marketing battle with the Brompton. The debate on their relative merits has been hashed out online a fair bit, but here is my perspective. On quality of build, both bikes were not so great back in the 1990s when the back end and stem of a Birdy would get stress fractures in the aluminium, and so would Brompton handlebars (earlier in time). All this has been ironed out – current Birdies, particularly the MkIII  are built to last, and with standard headsets, derailleur gears and cranks, even disc brakes, that you can source almost anywhere. Brompton bits, however, are a bit more specialised since many are made in the factory and the firm does not like outsourcing more than necessary. In terms of gearsBirdys have far more, up to 10 speeds on the standard models and even a Rohloff option, and the standard derailleurs work well. Brompton relied on a narrow Sturmey Archer hub for its 3/5 speeds (5 speed gearchange not always good), then used SRam after SA went bust in 2000, now offering a mix of hub and 2 derailleur options, very inferior to the Birdy. Hub gears don’t get grime in them, but changing the back tyre is more tricky and a lot of fuss is made about getting gear ratios right on an odd 2 lever system. They also have 2 speed and single speed models, but nothing beats a proper gear range with the least friction. On suspension, always desirable on a bike with small wheels, the Birdy is the gold standard. The front suspension is no-dive and pretty unique; the back is similar to a Brompton. The Birdy wins hands down with its dual setup. No front suspension on a Brompton has predictable effects on rough roads. On speed, all my trials – and others except AtoB’s downhill rolling tests- suggest the Birdy is the clear winner. You can put slick tyres on both which make a huge difference with small wheels, but the Birdy is light and with its gear range it pulls away uphill. Weight is about equal between the two, say 10.5-12.5kg on average, and both have titanium options and so-on that most people cannot afford. The Brompton is made of steel, the Birdy aluminium.  On luggage, the Brompton is better – it has a special bag. You can adapt those to a Birdy or get panniers front or rear, but most will not bother and just use a rucksack. On folding up, the Brompton is better (smaller) although not necessarily quicker – I can fold both in the same number of seconds. On the Birdy you have to get the gears and pedal in the right places before starting, and the package is bigger (MkIIIs are smaller than before).

My summation is that if you want to go fast in a city or a rural environment, buy a Birdy. You can go for kms before you get tired and the engineering is fantastic, especially if you are tall. The handlebars adjust up and down on a Birdy – not on a Brompton. The disadvantage is the folded package size, the creaks you often get from the suspension, and needing to tighten things up if you are heavy like me.  I think the Birdy is undersold. It is not in enough shops. It could be that the company needs to innovate its supply chain and list of models, but it looks like they do release attractive new variants. A major major supplier in the US, NYCEwheels, has pulled out from stocking Birdys and now promotes its Bromptons. The change in language since this has happened in 2014 is interesting, and perhaps this is replicated elsewhere. Initially they promoted and sold both machines, and branded the Birdy as an excellent deluxe option (see the comparative review here).  Now it is all about the Brompton. A similar thing happened in Australia with St. Kilda cycles and also Cheeky Transport in Sydney, but now St.Kilda are selling Birdys again. Velo Cycles in Melbourne say that if they stocked Birdys they would sell only 1-2 a year – but their 3 speed Bromptons are now up at AU$2000. For less than that you can get a 9 speed Birdy at St.Kilda Cycles across town- I have one of those -customers would better to try both.

The point being – if Birdys are not available in the same shops as the Bromptons, it is obvious which customers will buy. The most comprehensive review, of a budget Birdy model, is here – hardly inferior to a Brompton.

Anyway as I travel the world with Birdys, I have concluded I will stick with them. You can go fast and in comfort. Take-off speed is excellent. Speed is less important at my age, but effort and comfort, with those bigger wheels, full suspension and adjustable bars, does matter and Bromptons just do not have those things. I have in any event, after 40 years on folders, probably saved thousands of dollars in public transport fares, hundreds of hours in waiting and walking times, beaten transportation strikes and carriage restrictions on trains, trams and buses, and intrigued a few university students who see the Birdy propped up against the lectern every week. I am not one of those academics that drives to work to then lecture about sustainability.

New Birdy frame June 2015 http://en.r-m.de/news/riese-mueller-introduce-the-new-birdy/

Postscript Oct. 2015. Early in September I was hit by a large truck doing 50-60km/h when riding my Birdy in Melbourne. I was in hospital for almost three weeks. The Birdy was caught under the truck, I did somersaults along the road, but survived. No more bikes of any type for me for a while. Too many fractures. The whole story is here – it is remarkable. I think the Birdy has survived, the seatpost is bent, I have to take it to a specialist. 

 From Pacific Cycles

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New synthesis on the field of political ecology

Batterbury, S.P.J. 2015. Doing political ecology inside and outside the academy. In Bryant, R. (ed.) International Handbook of Political Ecology. Edward Elgar. Pp. 27-43.

Abstract

The chapter presents a survey of political ecology (PE) scholarship in, and beyond, academic institutions. This interdisciplinary field makes a contribution to understanding environmental and social justice issues, that require explanations at multiple scales, often challenging powerful state and corporate actors. Radical and critical scholarship like PE survives because of sustained student demand, but in neoliberal universities battling financial shortfalls and sometimes a reluctance to invest in research areas that offer critique of powerful institutions and of injustice. Political ecologists have a substantial presence in North America and Europe, either as individual scholars or in small research clusters, but are found across the world and are networked virtually and through key events and collaborative ventures. Publishing outlets include at least three dedicated journals. The extent to which academic political ecology can, and should, make a contribution to engaged scholarship, stepping beyond the boundaries of academic investigation into the messy world of environmental politics is debated, but embraced by some academics, numerous NGOs, and civil society organizations. The future of the field is assured if environmental despoliation, denial of access to resources, and inequality continues; and if its hopes for better world are not extinguished by much more powerful actors in and outside the university system.

Partial summary

http://www.simonbatterbury.net/pubs/Batterbury%20Doing%20political%20ecology%20inside%20and%20outside%20the%20academy.pdf

On Google Books

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=X45HCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA14&lpg=PA14&dq=international+handbook+of+political+ecology&source=bl&ots=tlqf3rEUSQ&sig=FH4kQ-1uj8f1XLz39QVbn2VQ_As&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CDYQ6AEwBGoVChMIlJiD5-KMyAIVhximCh30BQCn#v=onepage&q=batterbury&f=false

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New article on little-studied region of Grande Terre, New Caledonia

Kowasch M., S.P.J. Batterbury, M. Neumann. 2015. Contested sites, land claims and economic development in Poum, New Caledonia. Settler Colonial Studies 5(4): 302-316.

Abstract

Property relations are often ambiguous in postcolonial settings. Property is only considered as such if socially legitimate institutions sanction it. In indigenous communities, access to natural resources is frequently subject to conflict and negotiation in a ‘social arena’. Settler arrivals and new economic possibilities challenge these norms and extend the arena. The article analyses conflicts and negotiations in the French overseas territory of New Caledonia in the light of its unique settler history and economic activity, focussing on the little-studied remote northern district of Poum on the Caledonian main island Grande Terre. In this region, the descendants of British fishermen intermarried with the majority Kanak clans. We illustrate the interaction between customary conflicts, European settlement, struggles for independence and a desire for economic development. Customary claims are in tension with the attractions of economic growth and service delivery, which has been slow in coming to Poum for reasons largely outside the control of local people.

Draft on Researchgate

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281372191_Contested_sites_land_claims_and_economic_development_in_Poum_New_Caledonia

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New article on land tenure and community in East Timor

Batterbury S.P.J, L.R.Palmer, T.Reuter, D. do Amaral de Carvalho,  B. Kehi, A. Cullen. 2015. Land access and livelihoods in post-conflict Timor-Leste: no magic bullets. International Journal of the Commons. 9(2): 619-647.

http://www.thecommonsjournal.org/index.php/ijc/article/view/514  (free online)

Abstract

In Timor-Leste, customary institutions contribute to sustainable and equitable rural development and the establishment of improved access to and management of land, water and other natural resources. Drawing on multi-sited empirical research, we argue that the recognition and valorization of custom and common property management is a prerequisite for sustainable and equitable land tenure reform in Timor-Leste. In a four-community study of the relationship between land access and the practice of rural livelihoods in eastern and western districts of Timor-Leste, where customary management systems are dominant, we found different types of traditional dispute resolution, with deep roots in traditional forms of land management and with varying levels of conflict. The article shows how customary land tenure systems have already managed to create viable moral economies. Interviewees expressed a desire for the government to formalize its recognition and support for customary systems and to provide them with basic livelihood support and services. This was more important than instituting private landholding or state appropriation of community lands, which is perceived to be the focus of national draft land laws and an internationally supported project. We suggest ways in which diverse customary institutions can co-exist and work with state institutions to build collective political legitimacy in the rural hinterlands, within the context of upgrading the quality of rural life, promoting social and ecological harmony, and conflict management.

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New article on effects of neoliberalism in Colombia

J. Marcela Chaves-Agudelo, Simon P. J. Batterbury, Ruth Beilin. 2015. “We Live From Mother Nature” : Neoliberal Globalization, Commodification, the “War on Drugs,” and Biodiversity in Colombia Since the 1990s. SAGE Open 5: 3 1-15 (free online) http://sgo.sagepub.com/content/5/3/2158244015596792

Abstract

This article explores how macroeconomic and environmental policies instituted since the 1990s have altered meanings, imaginaries, and the human relationship to nature in Colombia. The Colombian nation-state is pluri-ethnic, multilingual, and megabiodiverse. In this context, indigenous peoples, Afro-Colombians, and some peasant communities survive hybridization of their cultures. They have developed their own ways of seeing, understanding, and empowering the world over centuries of European rule. However, threats to relatively discrete cultural meanings have increased since major changes in the 1990s, when Colombia experienced the emergence of new and modern interpretations of nature, such as “biodiversity,” and a deepening of globalized neoliberal economic and political management. These policies involve a modern logic of being in the world, the establishment of particular regulatory functions for economies, societies, and the environment, and their spread has been facilitated by webs of political and economic power. We trace their local effects with reference to three indigenous groups.

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Filed under colombia, neoliberalism, political ecology